Mumps Outbreak: Are You at Risk?

Date: March 22, 2017 Author: Stephen Dunn Categories: Latest
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With Spring just around the corner, the days are getting longer and temperatures are beginning to rise. This is great news for those of us looking forward to greenery and flowers coming back, but the warm and moist conditions are also the perfect breeding ground for viruses, mold, germs and bacteria.

One such virus is the highly-contagious mumps virus which has been in the news lately because of a higher than normal number of reported cases in both the United States and Canada. Washington State has had over 404 reported cases since January 1st, and Toronto has a record 37 cases so far this year.1 The number of cases in Toronto doesn’t sound like a lot, but for comparison, the city saw an average of only five cases a year between 1997 and 2009.2 The resurgence is concerning to say the least and officials have been monitoring the cases closely.

More recently, the Vancouver Canucks were hit hard with the mumps virus when more than 5 of their players and staff began having symptoms. These players were immediately quarantined for at least 5-days or until the virus had cleared their system and their test results came back negative. With a significant portion of the team unable to play during this time, the Canucks were forced to call up 4 players from their minor league affiliate with just a combined total of nine games of NHL experience.

The mumps virus causes swelling and pain in the neck and jaw areas, and is often accompanied by fever, fatigue, and muscle aches. The virus can sometimes lead to more serious conditions including meningitis or infection in the brain.3 The virus is highly contagious and spreads through mucous and saliva. An infected person can spread the virus by coughing, sneezing, or talking, sharing items, such as cups or eating utensils with others, and touching objects or surfaces with unwashed hands that are then touched by others.4

So, are you and your family at risk? The short answer is yes, but the likelihood of catching the mumps is quite low unless you know someone with the virus or are in contact with a lot of different people during the day. However, along with the mumps, this time of year brings the perfect conditions for a plethora of other viruses, germs, bacteria, molds and allergens to flourish. Cold and Flu season is still among us and some other nasty viruses are starting to make the rounds.

Washing your hands and disinfecting surfaces are the two best ways to avoid viruses, germs and other nasty critters this time of year. However, while you’re likely to regularly disinfect your kitchen or bathroom, when was last time you disinfected your vehicle? Have you ever disinfected your vehicle? No one ever thinks their vehicle could be the reason their family gets ill, but your vehicle can harbour all these viruses, molds, bacterias and allergens that embed themselves on surfaces, in carpets and headliners and most importantly deep in your heater vents where it’s moist and warm. Some of the nastiest viruses and bacteria can actually live on these surfaces for weeks, which increases the risk of someone in your family contracting the illness.

The solution is simple. Think of Purifyd as a flu shot for your car. The treatment quickly and effectively disinfects and eliminates 99.99999% of the nasty viruses, bacteria and allergens present in your vehicle, even in your heater system. The unique Purifyd formula is registered with Health Canada and is completely safe, even for food handling surfaces. It also leaves an antimicrobial layer on your vehicle’s surfaces after the treatment that helps fight off future molds, viruses and bacteria. The treatment has no smell and can be performed by a certified service center in under an hour. A Purifyd vehicle treatment is your family’s first line of defense against nasty illnesses this year.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Purifyd

CLICK HERE to find a Purifyd Service Provider near you.


1 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/mumps-cases-1.4022641
2 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/mumps-cases-1.4022641
3 http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/infectious-diseases-a-z-resurgence-in-mumps-infections/
4 http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mumps/basics/causes/con-20019914